A Response to John MacArthur

 

We cannot dismiss the deep history of pain and torment that African American and other minority communities have suffered through for hundreds of years. Read More »

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Resistance & Peacemaking

Ok. Take a deep breath. (Perhaps this is more a reminder for myself than for you, the reader, but I encourage you to do so nonetheless). It has now been a week since Donald Trump was elected to become the next president of the United States and as the flood of immediate reactions has simmered down, I find that I am finally in a place to express a few thoughts that have been stewing in my mind over the past week – not just in response to the election, but even more importantly in response to people’s reactions.

Now, before I begin, let me just say that politics has never been my favorite topic. I always disliked how worked up I would get or how divisive it felt having to choose sides on issues when the options at hand rarely accounted for nuance and personal experience. And yet, somehow, I let myself get sucked in this time. I think I justified it at first by reminding myself that I needed to be informed and wanted to engage in social issues and that I had a responsibility to take my vote seriously, etc. And yes, those are all good things, but now that the election is over, I realized that despite my best efforts, I was unable to make it through this election season unscathed by the drama, the overgeneralized opinions and the continued polarization that has increased division in this country.
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Baseball and Politics

Every year, the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics play each other in what is known as “the Bay Bridge Series.” This series brings with it local bragging rights as well as great trash talking between both fan bases. I had the privilege of going to the last game of the series with three good friends. Two of these friends happened to be Giants fans, and I noticed something about the way we talked all throughout the game that made me think about how baseball seems to be more civilized than our political parties.

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The Bully Pulpit

Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “Bully Pulpit” to describe how influential the White House could be in advocating a sociopolitical agenda. When he coined the term, however, the phrase “bully” had a different meaning than it does today. To call it a Bully Pulpit meant that it was a good platform to project an agenda. Remember the term “bully for you”? During the time of Roosevelt, it would have meant “good for you.” All that to say, when Theodore Roosevelt called the White House a “Bully Pulpit,” he meant it to be a positive thing to further ideas and agendas in American society. Read More »